Dental Health

SOME BEST DETAL PRACTICES TO KEEP YOUR TEETH HEALTHY

Taking care of your teeth.

Achieving healthy teeth takes a lifetime of care. Even if you’ve been told that you have nice teeth, it’s crucial to take the right steps every day to take care of them and prevent problems. This involves getting the right oral care products, as well as being mindful of your daily habits.

1. Don’t go to bed without brushing your teeth

It’s no secret that the general recommendation is to brush at least twice a day. Still, many of us continue to neglect brushing our teeth at night. But brushing before bed gets rid of the germs and plaque that accumulate throughout the day.

2. Brush properly

The way you brush is equally important — in fact, doing a poor job of brushing your teeth is almost as bad as not brushing at all. Take your time, moving the toothbrush in gentle, circular motions to remove plaque. Unremoved plaque can harden, leading to calculus build-up and gingivitis (early gum disease).

3. Don’t neglect your tongue

Plaque can also build up on your tongue. Not only can this lead to bad mouth odour, but it can lead to other oral health problems. Gently brush your tongue every time you brush your teeth.

4. Use a fluoride toothpaste

When it comes to toothpaste, there are more important elements to look for than whitening power and flavours. No matter which version you choose, make sure it contains fluoride.

While fluoride has come under scrutiny by those worried about how it impacts other areas of health, this substance remains a mainstay in oral health. This is because fluoride is a leading defence against tooth decay. It works by fighting germs that can lead to decay, as well as providing a protective barrier for your teeth.

5. Treat flossing as important as brushing

Many who brush regularly neglect to floss. Flossing is not just for getting little pieces of food or broccoli that may be getting stuck in between your teeth, as Jonathan Schwartz, DDS. points out. “It’s really a way to stimulate the gums, reduce plaque, and help lower inflammation in the area.”

Flossing once a day is usually enough to reap these benefits.

At Astradental services we offer various types of flosses, you can always contact us.

6. Don’t let flossing difficulties stop you

Flossing can be difficult, especially for young children and older adults with arthritis. Rather than give up, look for tools that can help you floss your teeth. Ready-to-use dental flossers from the drugstore can make a difference.

7. Consider mouthwash

Advertisements make mouthwash seem necessary for good oral health, but many people skip them because they don’t know how they work. Schwartz says mouthwash helps in three ways: It reduces the amount of acid in the mouth, cleans hard-to-brush areas in and around the gums, and re-mineralizes the teeth. “Mouthwashes are useful as an adjunct tool to help bring things into balance,” he explains. “I think in children and older people, where the ability to brush and floss may not be ideal, a mouthwash is particularly helpful.”

Ask your dentist for specific mouthwash recommendations. Certain brands are best for children, and those with sensitive teeth. Prescription mouthwash is also available.

Purchase mouthwash online.

8. Drink more water

Water continues to be the best beverage for your overall health — including oral health. Also, as a rule of thumb, Schwartz recommends drinking water after every meal. This can help wash out some of the negative effects of sticky and acidic foods and beverages in between brushes.

9. Eat crunchy fruits and vegetables

Ready-to-eat foods are convenient, but perhaps not so much when it comes to your teeth. Eating fresh, crunchy produce not only contains more healthy fiber, but it’s also the best choice for your teeth. “I tell parents to get their kids on harder-to-eat and chew foods at a younger age,” says Schwartz. “So try to avoid the overly mushy processed stuff, stop cutting things into tiny pieces, and get those jaws working!”

10. Limit sugary and acidic foods

Ultimately, sugar converts into acid in the mouth, which can then erode the enamel of your teeth. These acids are what lead to cavities. Acidic fruits, teas, and coffee can also wear down tooth enamel. While you don’t necessarily have to avoid such foods altogether, it doesn’t hurt to be mindful.

11. See your dentist at least twice a year

Your own everyday habits are crucial to your overall oral health. Still, even the most dutiful brushers and flossers need to see a dentist regularly. At minimum, you should see your dentist for cleanings and checkups twice a year. Not only can a dentist remove calculus and look for cavities, but they will also be able to spot potential issues and offer treatment solutions.

Some dental insurance companies even cover more frequent dental checkups. If this is the case for you, take advantage of it. Doing so is especially helpful if you have a history of dental issues, such as gingivitis or frequent cavities.

You can book for a dental checkup here https://astradental.co.ke/astradental-booking-form/ or call us on 0727591579 or 0732561588 for consultations and dental enquires.

Dental Health

Dental Care for Elderly

Advancing age puts many Elderly at risk for a number of oral health problems, such as:

. Darkened teeth.

Caused, to some extent, by changes in dentin — the bone-like tissue that underlies the tooth enamel — and by a lifetime of consuming stain-causing foods and beverages. Also caused by thinning of the outer enamel layer that lets the darker yellower dentin show through. A darkened tooth or teeth may be a sign of a more serious problem and should be checked by your dentist.

  • Dry mouth.

  Caused by reduced saliva flow, which can be a result of cancer treatments that use radiation to the head and neck area, as well as certain diseases, such as Sjogren’s syndrome, and medication side effects. Many medicines can cause dry mouth.

  • Diminished sense of taste.

 While advancing age impairs the sense of taste, diseases, medications, and dentures can also contribute to this sensory loss.

  • Root decay.

This is caused by exposure of the tooth root to decay-causing acids. The tooth roots become exposed as gum tissue recedes from the tooth. Roots do not have any enamel to protect them and are more prone to decay than the crown part of the tooth.

  • Gum disease.

Caused by plaque and made worse by food left in teeth, use of tobacco products, poor-fitting bridges and dentures, poor diets, and certain diseases, such as anaemia, cancer, and diabetes, this is often a problem for older adults.

  • Tooth loss.

Gum disease is a leading cause of tooth loss.

  • Uneven jawbone.

This is caused by tooth and then not replacing missing teeth. This allows the rest of the teeth to drift and shift into open spaces

  • Denture-induced stomatitis.

 Ill-fitting dentures, poor dental hygiene, or a build-up of the fungus Candida albicans cause this condition, which is inflammation of the tissue underlying a denture.

  • Thrush.

Diseases or drugs that affect the immune system can trigger the overgrowth of the fungus Candida albicans in the mouth.

Age in and of itself is not a dominant or sole factor in determining oral health. However, certain medical conditions, such as arthritis in the hands and fingers, may make brushing or flossing teeth difficult to impossible to perform. Drugs can also affect oral health and may make a change in your dental treatment necessary.

Oral Hygiene Tips for Seniors

Daily brushing and flossing of natural teeth is essential to keeping them in good oral health. Plaque can build up quickly on the teeth of seniors, especially if oral hygiene is neglected, and lead to tooth decay and gum disease.

To maintain good oral health, it’s important for all individuals — regardless of age — to:

  • Brush at least twice a day with a fluoride-containing toothpaste
  • Floss at least once a day
  • Rinse with an antiseptic mouthwash once or twice a day
  • Visit your dentist on a regular schedule for cleaning and an oral exam
  • Antibacterial mouth rinse can reduce bacteria that cause plaque and gum disease, according to the American Dental Association.

What Seniors Can Expect During a Dental Exam

If you’re a senior headed for a check up, your dentist should conduct a thorough history and dental exam.

 Questions asked during a dental history

  • The approximate date of your last dental visit and reason for the visit
  • If you have noticed any recent changes in your mouth
  • If you have noticed any loose or sensitive teeth
  • If you have noticed any difficulty tasting, chewing, or swallowing
  • If you have any pain, discomfort, sores, or bleeding in your mouth
  • If you have noticed any lumps, bumps, or swellings in your mouth

During an oral exam, your dentist will check the following: your face and neck (for skin discoloration, moles, sores); your bite (for any problems in how the teeth come together while opening and closing your mouth); your jaw (for signs of clicking and popping in the temporomandibular joint); your lymph nodes and salivary glands (for any sign of swelling or lumps); your inner cheeks (for infections, ulcers, traumatic injuries); your tongue and other interior surfaces — floor of the mouth, soft and hard palate, gum tissue (for signs of infection or oral cancer); and your teeth (for decay, condition of fillings, and cracks).

If you wear dentures or other appliances, your dentist will ask a few questions about when you wear your dentures and when you take them out (if removable). They will also look for any irritation or problems in the areas in the mouth that the appliance touches and examine the denture or appliance itself (looking for any worn or broken areas).

Children Dental Oral Teeth

Endemic fluorosis-Discoloration of Teeth

No Comments

Endemic fluorosis

Endemic fluorosis caused by the consumption of high-fluoride groundwater is a public health problem in Nakuru, in the Kenyan Rift Valley. The present study was carried out during the period January–February 2017 to determine the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis among patients of two Nakuru healthcare facilities. The patients consisted of both young and old members of the Nakuru population served with groundwater containing high levels of fluoride ranging from 0.1 to 72 mg/l.

How common are discoloured or stained teeth?

While no one knows for sure how many of us suffer from stained teeth, it’s clear that how healthy and white our teeth are is something we care about. These days, we see a shiny smile as a sort of social status symbol, making whitening products and procedures pretty popular. Most of us (99%) consider our smile our most important social feature, according to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry.

A simple stroll down any drugstore oral care aisle reveals a wide assortment of whitening trays, strips, toothpastes and mouthwashes. Now more than ever, we are putting our money where our mouths are, spending more on both over-the-counter and professional whitening products and procedures every year. If you’re ready to whiten your smile, there are options for every budget — but it pays to know which are safe and effective — and which may do more harm than good.

PROFESSIONAL TEETH WHITENING

Professional teeth whitening is much preferred over over the counter whitening products. Over the counter whitening systems often come in one size fits all, leading to uneven whitening. It can also lead to the bleaching agent getting on your gums and causing issues with sensitivity. Professional whitening helps to prevent that.

We offer both in-office and take-home whitening treatments. The in-office version is great for getting a whiter smile quickly, such as for an event. A bleaching agent is painted onto the teeth, with guards to prevent it from getting on the gums. A special light is used to activate the bleaching agent. In about an hour, you’ll have a smile up to eight shades whiter!

Take-home whitening is used to whiten your teeth gradually and for touchups after in-office whitening. We’ll take impressions of your teeth to create custom whitening trays. The bleaching agent is evenly spread in the trays and you wear them for a few hours every night. As the weeks go by, you’ll see your smile whitening to the shade you’re looking for.

PORCELAIN VENEERS

For a more permanent whitening solution, as well as if you have stains resistant to traditional treatment, porcelain veneers are perfect. Usually from certain medications, you can get stubborn stains that resist traditional treatment. Porcelain veneers are made of a thin shell of dental ceramic that goes over the front and sides of your tooth. They can cover the entire tooth that’s stained.

Porcelain veneers are ideal because they’re durable and stain-resistant. They’re a permanent solution for stains on your teeth. They can be color-matched to the rest of your smile and are shaped and sized to blend in seamlessly. Veneers can be placed on a number of teeth or just certain ones that are impacted.

DENTAL BONDING

Dental bonding is an economically sound choice, as well as a solid alternative to porcelain veneers if you’re not ready for a permanent solution. The bonding material is a biocompatible resin. This resin can be molded and shaped to fit whatever tooth has discoloration. The resin can also be color-matched to the rest of your smile or made to be as white as you’d like.

Dental bonding can be done in a quick visit to your dentist. The surface of your tooth is prepared for the resin to adhere to. The resin is painted onto your tooth, shaped to your liking. Once you’re happy with the result, a special light is used to harden the resin. It’s polished so that it matches the natural sheen of the rest of your smile.

COSMETIC DENTISTRY IN ASTRADENTAL SERVICES

Are you ready to get a whiter smile? Call us or schedule an appointment online.

Dental

DENTAL MYTHS

One Comment

There is a wealth of advice available online regarding tips for proper oral care.

Unfortunately,

much of it is false or misleading. New developments in healthcare happen each day, and sometimes the messages get crossed. Other dental myths have existed for years, passed down from generations before. Set the record straight with the facts. Here are the top dental myths and misconceptions.

Myth 1: Sugar Causes Cavities

While sugar does contribute to the formation of cavities,

it’s not the sugar itself that causes the problem. Rather, it’s the bacteria that eats the sugar. Sticky food, like starches, attracts bacteria to thrive on and around teeth. These bacteria produce an acid compound that promotes tooth decay. Rinse and brush after meals to reduce acid and plaque buildup.

Myth 2: Bleeding Gums Are Normal

Bleeding gums during brushing or flossing is due to inflammation of the gums. Gums can become inflamed and begin to bleed due to excessive plaque buildup, the onset of gingivitis, gum disease or other causes. It’s not normal. You’ll want to contact your dentist for an exam.

Myth 3: Brushing Harder Cleans Better

Brushing harder is counterproductive. The harder you brush, the more trauma the tooth enamel and gum tissue endure. It can eventually lead to other problems such as gum recession. Brush gently for two minutes, twice daily with a soft-bristled brush.

Myth 4: Flossing Is Not Really Necessary

Flossing is an integral part of maintaining good oral health. One in 10 Kenyans flosses, and only 40% of those who do floss daily. Flossing removes up to 80% of plaque. Plaque deposits promote tooth decay, but you can remove them with a daily flossing regimen.

 Myth 5: Chewing Gum Works Like Brushing

Chewing gum is not a replacement for brushing your teeth. Some chewing gums can promote cleaner teeth and better breath, and some dentists even recommend the sugar-free varieties to chew on instead of candy. However, while some chewing gums serve as aids to oral health, they still don’t reach the level of being able to replace brushing your teeth.

 Myth 6: White Teeth Are Healthy Teeth

Whiter teeth are not always healthier teeth. Teeth begin white, and over time, they can become discolored through staining or damage. Whitening teeth may leave the underlying cause of discoloration unaddressed. If your teeth are losing their luster, speak to your dentist about why.

 Myth 7: Charcoal Toothpaste Is Better

Charcoal toothpaste is marketed for whitening but in reality, it offers little protection for teeth. Charcoal toothpaste actually works against teeth by absorbing protective agents meant to keep teeth healthy and strong.

Myth 8: Kids Don’t Need to Brush Baby Teeth

Poor oral health early on can lead to lifelong complications. Kids should start brushing twicer per day as soon as they have teeth. Tooth decay in children can lead to health concerns long after their baby teeth are gone.

 Myth 9: Enamel Loss Causes Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity has many causes. Enamel loss can lead to sensitivity, but so can tooth grinding (bruxism), abrasive toothpaste and more. If you’re experiencing tooth sensitivity, discuss these symptoms with your dentist.

Myth 10: Gum Disease Is Only a Concern for Your Mouth

The bacteria present in gum disease can spread to other parts of your body, and there are more and more studies that have connected gum disease to whole-body health concerns. Gum disease may be linked to heart disease, diabetes, and some forms of cancer.

Myth 11: If You Have No Oral Health Concerns, There’s No Need for an Exam

An exam is the best way to spot trouble before it starts. The longer problems go undetected or untreated, the harder they are to treat when you do start to notice them. Semi-annual dental exams for adults and kids are the best way to maintain optimal oral health — so even if you don’t notice anything amiss, it’s best to still schedule routine dental checkups.

Give us a visit today

Proactive dental care is the best defense against tooth decay, gum disease and other threats to dentistry. To speak to a dentist about your oral health, or to schedule an examination, book online or call us at 0727591579.

Dental

MASK MOUTH

What Is Mask Mouth?

Masks help prevent the spread of infectious diseases — like the Covid-19 virus — protecting both you and those you come in contact with. The simple barrier helps stop respiratory droplets from traveling into the air and onto other people when a person wearing the mask coughs, sneezes, talks, or raises their voice. However, wearing a mask for an extended period can create unwanted side effects, such as mask mouth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends wearing a mask in public settings, and studies show masks play a crucial role in slowing the virus’s spread, so getting rid of this protective measure is not the answer. Instead, learn all about mask mouth — what it is, what causes it, and how you can prevent it — so you can find relief.

What Causes Mask Mouth?

Mask mouth describes the variety of oral side effects from wearing a mask for an extended time. Mask mouth might include dry mouth, bad breath, tooth decay, and even gum disease. Dental professionals attribute these side effects to a few factors:

  • Disrupted breathing patterns. A study conducted by PNMedical shows how wearing a mask can impact your breathing, causing more rapid, shallow breaths using your mouth, chest, and neck instead of your diaphragm. Breathing out of your mouth decreases the amount of saliva, which plays an important role in your oral health — washing away food debris and defending your teeth from cavities.
  • Dehydration. Wearing a mask also causes you to drink less water than usual. Dehydration can lead to dry mouth, increasing your risk of tooth decay and bad breath.
  • Recycling air. When you wear a mask, you trap more carbon dioxide in your mouth than usual, according to Aerosol and Air Quality Research. This amount of carbon dioxide does not have a toxicological effect on your body. However, it can increase your oral microbiome’s acidity, which might put you at risk for infections or inflammatory conditions like gum disease.

What Are Mask Mouth Symptoms?

The severity of mask mouth symptoms varies for each person, but the condition most commonly presents itself as:

  • Dry mouth. Xerostomia, or dry mouth, occurs when you don’t have enough saliva to keep your mouth moist. Not only does dry mouth make it difficult to eat, swallow, and speak, but it also increases your chance of developing tooth decay and other oral infections.
  • Bad breath. What you eat, your oral hygiene habits and dry mouth can all cause halitosis, more commonly known as bad breath. Prolonged mask-wearing can intensify dry mouth, but it also traps the stench caused by poor oral hygiene or eating smelly foods like garlic and onions.
  • Bleeding gums. If you notice your gums are swollen or bleeding, it could be a sign of gingivitis. Wearing a mask may impact the type and amount of bacteria in your mouth, which can cause plaque build-up and advance that to your gum tissues.

How Do You Prevent Mask Mouth?

Even if you experience some of these symptoms, keep wearing your mask. Wearing your mask slows the spread of the virus and helps protect the vulnerable in your community. Instead, implement some of these preventative measures:

  • Focus on your oral care routine. Brush your teeth for two minutes twice a day and clean between your teeth with floss or other interdental devices once a day. Make sure you use the proper brushing technique to clean all your mouth’s nooks and crannies.
  • Freshen up between cleanings. Keep a mouthwash on hand to freshen your breath and fight bacteria between cleanings. Ask your dental professional to recommend a mouthwash that does not exacerbate dry mouth. Chewing sugar-free gum can also help remove food debris and fix bad breath.
  • Keep an eye on tooth and gum health. Because mask mouth increases your chances of infection, watch out for sensitive teeth and gums. If you notice any discoloration, pain, bleeding, or tenderness, see your dentist as soon as you safely can for treatment.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink water throughout the day to help prevent dry mouth. It might also help to limit alcohol and coffee consumption, which can cause dehydration.
  • Use a clean mask. Regularly replace or clean your mask to prevent bacterial growth. The CDC recommends washing your mask daily or throwing your mask out after each wear.
  • Contact a health professional. If you notice any oral complications from extended mask use, contact your dentist immediately. Similarly, if your mask causes skin issues, talk to your dermatologist.

Mask mouth might create an inconvenience, but it’s easy to address with the right tools. Plus, the price of paying extra attention to your oral care is worth protecting your neighbors and friends from the Covid-19 virus. So mask up and keep up with your oral hygiene!

Call Us Now!